Jump to content
ThomasI

Maximilianshafen

Recommended Posts

So, I laid more tracks inside.
In the garden in I removed the winter tarpaulin and started cleaning a little.

IMG_20200417_200229.jpg

IMG_20200417_195832.jpg

15871469633012554479699775995959.jpg

IMG_20200417_195839.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great to see the covers coming off - I take it play is about to resume?

Looking at the indoor section I can't help thinking there's going to be one heck of a noise when you get all the trains running round there. The final photo in your previous post is mind boggling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, mick said:

Great to see the covers coming off - I take it play is about to resume?

Looking at the indoor section I can't help thinking there's going to be one heck of a noise when you get all the trains running round there. The final photo in your previous post is mind boggling.

Hello Mick 
Yes, if there are a lot of trains going it will not be quiet.
It is the same with the real railway.
But I have already thought about shielding the stagging yard and the "underground" connecting lines with some noise insulation.

 

Best Regards

Thomas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The bridgehead destroyed by rocket fire on New Year's Eve is being restored.

IMG_20200418_130120.jpg

IMG_20200418_131248.jpg

IMG_20200418_131822.jpg

IMG_20200419_150534.jpg

Edited by ThomasI
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You use the extremely expensive Styrodur adhesive from UHU and then it eats away the Styrodur anyway.
As a result, I was allowed to tear out the whole route.
Two switches are scrap, two more need repair.

Now I would like to use Medite Tricoya Extreme MDF board instead of Styrodur and PVC to rebuild, but I can't find a dealer in Germany who has it and cuts it.
That means probably the end of the building season outside this year ...

15876411610148229360131786730259.jpg

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But indoor I make some progess and will soon start with the installation of my big helix.

IMG-20200429-WA0012.jpeg

IMG-20200429-WA0010.jpeg

15881746904592106037854694874983.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like the helix is well on its way but how do you manage to get to work on it with all the ground level track in place? Is that a sliding door in the background?

Does the helix have to rise to the level of the framework that's fastened to the wall?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, mick said:

Looks like the helix is well on its way but how do you manage to get to work on it with all the ground level track in place? Is that a sliding door in the background?

Does the helix have to rise to the level of the framework that's fastened to the wall?

Hello Mick!
The sliding door is on the left, the one at the back is a wardrobe.
If necessary, you can roll it away or remove the bottom drawer and then crawl through it.
Otherwise you can walk around with caution on the rails of the lower level.
The helix will ride about 25cm higher than the level whose base is now visible.
This is about 110cm above the floor, the level you can see is 85cm above the floor.

Regards 

Thomas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Building a big helix in top of a small one is much more work as I estimated...

IMG_20200502_175922.jpg

IMG_20200502_175932.jpg

Edited by ThomasI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I made a roadtrip of about 400 miles/640km today and I got (yes!!!) two plates Medite Tricoya Extreme Durable MDF waterproof with 50 years guarantee.
Medite, a British manufacturer, had previously sent me a sample, which I kept for 6 days in a row in the filled sink for test purposes and the result exceeded all my expectations.
The Tricoya Extreme Durable MDF has neither warped nor swollen.
It is a material made for our purposes.

Pictures:

The sample after 6 days in water.

My plates.

The sample in the sink.

IMG-20200504-WA0020.thumb.jpeg.20ef438eecb038771afd45090353c1d3.jpeg

 

IMG_20200516_151603.jpg

IMG-20200504-WA0023.jpeg

Edited by ThomasI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, ThomasI said:

I made a roadtrip of about 400 miles/640km today and I got (yes!!!) two plates Medite Tricoya Extreme Durable MDF waterproof with 50 years guarantee.
Medite, a British manufacturer, had previously sent me a sample, which I kept for 6 days in a row in the filled sink for test purposes and the result exceeded all my expectations.
The Tricoya Extreme Durable MDF has neither warped nor swollen.
It is a material made for our purposes.....

 

Just been having a read on their website Thomas and as you say, it's something worth considering given the 50 year guarantee. It's not exactly cheap but there again, other similar materials we've been using aren't cheap either. I can see for your type of layout that it will be extremely suitable.

400 miles? That's further than I've travelled this whole year so far!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, mick said:

Just been having a read on their website Thomas and as you say, it's something worth considering given the 50 year guarantee. It's not exactly cheap but there again, other similar materials we've been using aren't cheap either. I can see for your type of layout that it will be extremely suitable.

400 miles? That's further than I've travelled this whole year so far!

After rigid foam PVC sheets and rigid PVC sheets were not heat-resistant enough for places with a lot of sun, acrylic and plexiglass became brittle and since no servos can be screwed onto Styodur, Medite Tricoya Extreme Durable MDF really seems to be the solution.

Compared to HPL, it convinces with its lower weight and above all because it can be processed like normal plywood or normal MDF.

The plates are available in a thickness of 4 mm to 21 mm.
This actually makes it possible to build a model railroad outside the way you are used to from inside.

And even if you sawed the material or drilled holes in it, no further treatment is required to survive outside.

 

Edited by ThomasI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First work with the new material.
I am still very excited.

15898420068505487321948908234333.jpg

15898420696708347551048489887046.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Thomas, wow, great to see your spiral coming a long, how many levels , those long points are awesome ,   I would like those longer curved point , some 2 feet long on a curve rather than the Peco larger curved points , I have the longer straight express points .

Your MBF board must be pretty good for outside , brother said even the water proof boards we do have wouldn't last long out side  in our extreme weather conditions .

The days here are pretty col with those  winds, not far of to winter,  I will be stepping up my construction of the bridge and layout to follow.

How is the working outside, you  said rocket fire from new year's eve party did the damage, wow rockets must of being falling out of the sky to do that damage,what happened. 

Keep the great work up and pics flowing of your progress, can't wait to see your high speed trains going through those points and spiral .

Tony.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, ThomasI said:

First work with the new material.
I am still very excited.

 

What thickness is the material? I think it is available in 9mm and 12mm. Obviously the thicker it is, the more expensive it becomes. Is it easy to saw and does it hold pins and screws well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Riddles said:

What thickness is the material? I think it is available in 9mm and 12mm. Obviously the thicker it is, the more expensive it becomes. Is it easy to saw and does it hold pins and screws well?

It is available in 4mm, 6mm, 9mm, 12mm, 15mm, 18mm, 19mm and 21mm. I got 6mm.

It is easy to saw and it holds pins and screws very well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, weather is good, progress also...😁😁😁

IMG_20200519_192517.jpg

IMG_20200519_192609.jpg

15899094633706613589939941282324.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so glad that all I have to do is cement a few rocks in place! You have my total admiration for getting on with this and as Tony says, those large radius points look amazing.

I keep saying it but it really is going to look stunning once it's completed.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...