Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
mick

Conisbrough Weather Station

Recommended Posts

After a couple of weeks where there's been very little activity on the weather front, the past few days have finally livened up a bit and allowed me to compare the readings I obtained from the weather station when it was located in Selby with the new ones from Conisbrough.

The actual weather station remains unchanged but its location is markedly different. Selby is situated just a few metres above sea level and the terrain is very flat whereas the home in Conisbrough is at an elevation some 60 metres higher. In Selby the sensors were in direct sunlight during the summer months and the wind gauges were in the shadow of the house and a fair number of overhanging trees. Although I could record data as a record of the weather specific to our back garden, it didn't closely match the data being recorded at neighbouring stations.

The property in Conisbrough is single storey, in an elevated position, and is free of obstructions from trees. Although not at a recommended height by any means, the wind gauges now provide much more accurate recordings. Even during the severe winds of 12th September this year, the highest gust recorded by my station in Selby was 28.9 mph with an average high wind speed of 9.8 mph and a total wind run for the day of 110.1 miles. The winds that day seemed much stronger than those we have experienced in Conisbrough today. I remember them well because it was just after we had erected our greenhouse and it proved a stern test of its durability - a test that it thankfully passed.

By way of comparison, the highest wind gust recorded by my station today (Saturday 26th November) was 36.5mph with an average high wind speed of 17.4 mph and a total wind run for the day of 217.3 miles. The previous 2 days have also similarly exceeded those Selby figures from 12th September.

In its current situation I have the option to elevate the wind gauges by an extra two feet without having to resort to any additional work or expense, which should provide even greater accuracy. First, I need to concrete the supporting post firmly into the ground.

I remember a time when I used to detest strong winds, cold weather, and heavy rain. If you're the same then do yourself a favour and get a weather station - it'll change your outlook on extreme weather completely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over recent days I've had the opportunity to compare data from 2 different weather stations located within a matter of feet of each other. The temperature and humidity sensors of one station are sited in an area with an open aspect whilst those of the second station are in a more shaded area. The open aspect station is currently 3 feet from the ground whilst the shaded station is 4ft 6ins.

At most times of the day there is very little difference between the data recorded by the 2 stations. Any discrepency between temperatures is usually within 0.4C and is fairly constant throughout the daylight hours. Humidity levels are also extremely similar with no more than a 2% variation at any time. The barometer readings from the 2 stations are almost identical throughout the entire day.

The most significant difference in temperature occurs during the night when the station in the shaded area can be as much as 0.8 degrees C cooler, as is currently being reported.

The point of all this? - well one station cost me less than £70 while the other would cost at least ten times that amount.

Are budget weather stations really worth getting and can they begin to compare with stations costing several times more? Well yes, I believe they are. The cheaper stations, now obtainable for less than £40, require a little more thought about their location and additional care with getting them set up but the results obtained can closely mimic those from a 'professional' station costing much more. I've had to carry out several guarantee-voiding modifications to my cheapo weather station in order to get it reporting with greater accuracy, and locate it in an area shielded from direct sunlight falling on the sensors but sufficiently exposed so that some sunlight falls on the solar panels for recharging of the batteries but I'm now happy with its current location.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well the weather's certainly been making the news this year even though it's been for all the wrong reasons but as it's now just over a year since I was given my first weather station I thought it about time that I added to this thread.

The older station, used when I lived in Selby, has now been replaced by a more professional model and I do admit that my interest hasn't waned one bit. I still monitor the data many times during the day and have a website dedicated to displaying live and historical data as recorded in my back garden. I have the main sensors and transmitter unit located above an area of grass close to the house and with the anemometer mounted on a tall pole further down the garden. The anemometer is currently connected to the sensor/transmitter by a length of cable that is laid around the lawn and across the planted borders and all the data from the transmitter is then sent wirelessly to an indoor display unit that connects to the PC. The problem is that when I'm cutting the grass or tending the borders I have a tendency to cut through the exposed cable. I've now got so fed up of doing it and having to solder the cables together again that I've purchased a separate transmitter unit to connect the anemometer directly to the indoor display panel meaning I can now get rid of that trailing cable. Connecting the new transmitter unit up will be my first task once this rain stops!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is your weather station purely a hobby or do you send reports to official bodies of what the weather is in your particular area. Such as when they say it's going to be a sunny day with warm temperatures and where you are it's raining cat and dogs.

Roy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh it's just a hobby Roy but I do upload the data to a couple of websites where it's used to provide current details of local weather. Local weather is the key I guess. Normal forecasts are more general for the country or region rather than your immediate locality which is why you often get a good soaking shortly after you've listened to the weather forecast and lathered yourself in sun lotion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't believe this is a thread I started in 2011 and haven't posted to since 2012! My interest in collecting my local weather data hasn't diminished one bit since then and presenting that data online is still one of my daily tasks.

The point of this post is simply to record that yesterday, 12th April 2019, was the first 'frost' day (temperature below freezing) we've have had in Worsley Dale country since the 3rd February. Not what I expected at all but then like buses, you wait 68 days for one and two come along together - today falling to  -1.1.

Not been a bad period though I don't think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...