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chris

Roofing Felt

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When I started this thread I posed some questions. One was whether to trim the felt to the edge of the baseboard or to lap it over the sides.

The first two pictures are the underside a baseboard installed in spring 2010 with felt trimmed to the edge.

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The next two are of a baseboard installed in autumn 2011 with felt lapped over the sides.

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One of these baseboard will be replaced this spring.

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I think it's vital to protect the edges of the plywood - they are the most susceptible areas to damp ingress. My baseboards aren't anywhere near as wide as the ones you've utilised as mine are just the width of double tracks but I've coated them on all sides and edges with several coats of bitumen before applying the felt and lapping it down over the edges. It has to be said that not all plywoods are the same either - some are more prone to delamination than others depending on source. I followed IanR's lead and applied an initial coat of bitumen diluted with white spirit so that it soaks well into the wood before applying a minimum of 2 coats of neat bitumen ensuring that the edges are well sealed.

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Sorry for resurrecting an old thread, but it seamed daft having two with the title of "Roofing Felt"

Hopefully I'll be at a stage either this weekend or next to start applying the felt and I was wondering the best way to fix it in place. I have already coated my boards in bitumen paint and was thinking that I would just apply the felt with bitumen adhesive, but now I'm worrying that the adhesive won't bond to the boards. Am I worrying over nothing and this is the way that it should be done?

If I were to just lay the felt with clout nails, I'd be worried about the felt bubbling over time

Cheers

Shaun

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That's the way I do mine Shaun. You should be fine. If I remember correctly IanR used a small roller like a wallpaper seam roller to bed it down nice and flat. Might be worth considering and help to keep your hands that bit cleaner.

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Thanks Mick - there's a video on youtube (Jenny Kirk I think) where she uses an old roller so that was definitely the plan. I was just concerned about adhesion more than anything, but if that's what works for you then that's a good enough answer for me!

Cheers

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I've not used it for baseboards but for shed roofs, I can assure you bitumen paint /glue will stick to anything, normally me included....

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You will be fine with the adhesive, it will bond well.

It's easier to work with on a warm day.

Do yourself a very very large favour and use a staple gun rather than clout nails. Use Galvanised 8mm staples.

There are two main advantages to using staples. The first is speed, you fly though the job. The second is that its a one handed job, which allows you to pull the roofing felt tight at the same time.

The other advantages are that you don't have the bother of dropping nails, it leaves a tidier finish and it's a really satisfying tool to work with.

I put a few photos of felt laying in my gallery. Looking at the dates on the photos I'm very pleased that my baseboards look as good as new after 5 winters.

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Would'nt be without mine, even use to fix track in position. Makes it easier to remove before before fixing permanatly.

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I recently bought some hooked knife blades for my Stanley knife. They weren't suitable for the job I got them for, but they are brilliant for cutting roofing felt.

 

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