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mick

Bird Photographs

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Hi Tony. The 5D is a full frame Canon Digital SLR, (Canon EOS 5D) the latest version of which I believe is still the MKIV. I have the earlier MKII from a few years ago as well as the MKIV.

The largest native bird in the UK is apparently the Sea Eagle (had to Google that one) although we don't get any round these parts. The largest bird we get to see is probably the Heron as it takes an interest in my Koi. I photographed the one below near Long Preston, just outside Settle in the Yorkshire Dales. They have a wingspan of between 1.5 and 2 metres.

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It's amazing to see just how steady their head remains while they search the streams for food. I have some video, taken on a blustery day, which shows the birds neck swaying about in the breeze but the head absolutely still while they focus on their prey.

I've had them stalking my pond on a number of occasions but its covered with a netted frame to keep them out.

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On 04/11/2018 at 14:38, roddy said:

Don't forget Buzzards, Kites, and Ospreys. 

I've not managed to photograph any of those yet Roddy and we see loads of Red Kites but it's always whilst were driving.

I thought I'd add a few photos of young Blue Tits this time. I've taken quite a lot though very few are worthy of displaying and just about all of them were taken around the bird feeder which does nothing for the natural setting.

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The ones below weren't quite ready to feed themselves

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Youngster and parent. Strange how the young ones have all the markings but not the adults colours.

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The one below was a quick snap of a youngster that settled on a neighbours fence.

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If you recall, back in October 2018 I managed to capture a few photographs of a female Sparrowhawk that had begun visiting the bird feeder in my garden. It had no intention of feasting on the goodies I was offering but rather hoping to land itself a meal of one of my smaller feathered visitors. Luckily for them they always managed to evade capture but their good fortune was bound to end at some point.

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As on previous occasions, I had to dash to grab a camera as soon as I saw the Sparrowhawk arrive but by the time I returned to take a photo it had already grabbed this little sparrow. Within a few seconds it was away carrying its prey with it. This time I'm told it was a male Sparrowhawk.

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Hi Mick great shot , we have small hawks like that one, called a different name though, see the birds scatter when the hawk flies in for a drink in the bird bath.

I have being waiting to get a pic of the rosella that flies in with his mate, have to wait till next week sadly still in hospital in for the weekend, hopefully home after Monday. They are a beautiful bird a few different species changes to other areas of Australia, the one that come in is yellow and blue .

Tony from down under.

 

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Please help me identify this Birb. it adopted me a couple months ago as a baby and now lives with me. It is an odd birb because it squeeks and chirps differently. After many attempts at trying to get it to fly, I have given up.

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Thank you. 

 

Her name is Squidlette.

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Welcome to the forum Squidlette!

I know it's not recommended that we become too acquainted with our local wildlife but when they're content in our company what's the harm. And had you not taken her in she probably wouldn't have survived in the wild anyway.

How does she react when you place her outdoors? Does she stay close by? Have you any plans to release her back into the wild?

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I built a large cage for her to adapt to being outside. She still goes crazy when she sees me in the kitchen window. I am afraid she's too humanized by now. I was hoping to release her, but I don't think she's wild enough. SO I will do a mixed semi wild approach.

And she really likes her chin rubs. She's quite tame. 

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Hi Griff, you don't have to have a permit over here we have to have one, closest to your squirrel  we have over here is the possum , we do have a flying squirrel, looks like you are stuck with your pet, I wouldn't let her go now, have you given her a name.

Tony from down under

 

 

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HI Mick, I finely got a good pic using the iPad's zoom to get a pretty god pic of that bird I have being waiting for called the pale-headed-rosella.

 

I will have to remember to bring out my good camera tomorrow now I know he is coming bard for a drink in the birth bath, there are other colours of that bird, he has a mate that comes in as well and if we are luck they bring in their babies too.

Glad to be home from Hospital, slowly getting back into the layout only in the early morning, too hot during the day, some relief in site  rain coming in next Tuesday in time for when the kids go back to school piece and quiet in the shopping centers.

Tony from down under.

 

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