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Storm trooper

Radius of curves

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Good Morning,

                          I am going out today to buy my flexi track for my first garden railway and I want to buy a tracksetta tool but which one I don’t know ? tight radius curves cause derailments on large locos etc but my area is only 3m by 3m and I want to run as close to the fence as possible to maximise the area if you know what I mean . How tight a radius could I go?

 

cheers Deano



9A4C1889-D369-4134-B0BA-957550CAF307.jpeg

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Hello

Hello, many models should be able to handle a radius of 360mm, but there are also increasingly models that require a minimum radius of 450mm or 480mm. I would therefore not fall below 500mm at least on the continuous tracks of the main line.

I have the narrowest radii in the depot, where the passage track does not fall below a radius of 740mm, the main tracks do not fall below 650mm.

On the sidings there are also radii down to 357mm. There then can not drive through every train.

Thomas

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34 minutes ago, ba14eagle said:

Deano

I wouldnt go below 30" radius if you can help it. 48" would be better ;)

30" = 762mm , 48" = 1220mm

This is of course better if it should look good. But on a level track, there is no technical reason for that. The only models in H0 / 00 that I know have a minimum radius of  > 600mm costs more than a small car.

And with an area of 3m x 3m (3000mm x 3000mm), just a circle would fit in at a radius of 48 "(1220mm).

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It all depends on what you run.

I think some HO scalers get a little crazy on curve radius. But if you can avoid the smaller train set sizes you are better off. Most train sets would come with 18" radius curves here in the USA. I don't know what the metric countries used. If you can keep it to 24" or better, you are doing well. But a larger curve would allow for more high speed running. :o

 

 

 

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Hi Storm Trouper , I have to agree with Traingeeboy, it depends what  locos you have , most 0-6-0  steam tank locos and 2-6-2 steam locos handle small curves, same with smaller diesel locos 4  wheel trucks,, you will getaway with 24inch curves ., watch the passenger coaches on how close they are hooked together, Hornby be ok 

See you have room to expand great idea, be looking forward-to seeing pics of your progress .

Going by your name you like Star Wars, seen The Last Jedi .

Tony from down under.

 

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18 hours ago, traingeekboy said:

It all depends on what you run.

I think some HO scalers get a little crazy on curve radius. But if you can avoid the smaller train set sizes you are better off. Most train sets would come with 18" radius curves here in the USA. I don't know what the metric countries used. If you can keep it to 24" or better, you are doing well. But a larger curve would allow for more high speed running. :o

 

 

 

 18" = 457mm

24" = 610mm

A minimum of 500mm as I recommended is 19,67"

In Europe 360mm is still standard.

360mm = 14,2"

Manufacturers offering models still reap shitstorms if those do not come through the 360mm radius.😂😂

 

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I visit several european model train forums and I look at their track work and see them running long coaches through small switches in stations. I am actually planning on using only larger switches on my mainline because it just seems more realistic. 

I'm not sure what the larger Atlas switches are as far as radius, but they are nice and long. Not as long as your switches Thomas, but still much bigger than I see on many layouts. 

 

Man, 500mm radius seems a bit small on an outdoor layout. ;) My indoor shed portion will probably have 22 inches and larger just to be sure. But now that you say 19 inches is standard in europe... hmmm... 

 

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17 hours ago, traingeekboy said:

I visit several european model train forums and I look at their track work and see them running long coaches through small switches in stations. I am actually planning on using only larger switches on my mainline because it just seems more realistic. 

I'm not sure what the larger Atlas switches are as far as radius, but they are nice and long. Not as long as your switches Thomas, but still much bigger than I see on many layouts. 

 

Man, 500mm radius seems a bit small on an outdoor layout. ;) My indoor shed portion will probably have 22 inches and larger just to be sure. But now that you say 19 inches is standard in europe... hmmm... 

 

I had understood Stormtrooper in such a way that he wants to have as much straight track as possible and therefore wants to keep the curves rather short and it depends more on the technically reasonable minimum radius and less on the optically desirable.

In the non-visible area, I also use switches with a radius of "only" 914mm (36") In the visible range, the planning provides for a minimum radius of 1524mm (60"), except for two curved turnouts.

The railway in Germany knows as the narrowest radius for turnouts converted to H0 2190mm (86 1/4").

Thomas

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4 hours ago, traingeekboy said:

I will make note of this. I will need a lot of 86 1/4 " radius switches.

Hmmm... why does my layout feel so small? :D

Tillig makes such points in Code 83:

https://www.tillig.com/eng/Produkte/produktinfo-85326.html

 

And if it may cost a little more, Weinert in collaboration with Peco in Code 75:

https://goo.gl/images/FCeNMx

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