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  1. Hi All, Well, I'm back again, can't believe it's been over a year since my last post! This time I've got a video, it's not great camera work, but it will do! As I realised the good weather was coming to an end, I was determined to get some filming done. I hope you enjoy it? Many thanks Mark.
    5 points
  2. It's heart-breaking news. Someone who contributed so much to the forum but who has sadly been taken before he could realise his layout dreams. We've shared Tony's ups and downs for over 7 years, and the poor man has endured his fair share of downs during that time, but he somehow managed to keep smiling and 'moving ahead'! I will miss his presence greatly here as I am sure the majority of our members will. My heartfelt condolences go to his wife and to all his family. Rest in peace Tony.
    5 points
  3. Hi Guys, not to bad a weekend. Have been out laying track for two days . My finger nails are a mess, with working on top of roofing felt. I have still got about half of the wires to join between rails yet. Unfortunately promised the C E O we would go away for a couple of days. Of cause its going to be dry and when we are away and come back rain. Still she deserved a treat for allowing me to proceed in our limited garden we have. Here's a picture of a Dapol Virgin Pendolino EMU. got for a cheap price. Runs nice to say the track a mess, but oh those fiddley copulins. Not made for my saw fingers and poor sight. (men in white coats here for me tomorrow) I not finish and thinking of stage 2. Thankyou all for your very useful articles about your railways its a enjoyable way to spend a odd wet hour looking at all the ideas
    4 points
  4. Well at last I have started on the baseboards. I have completed the two straight boards, just have to cover with roofing felt. I am fortunate that a neighbour is going to give me a hand as far as raising them off the ground, about 2 feet high. I just got the two loops at each end to sort out. So still a lot to do before anything runs.
    4 points
  5. I've gradually been getting some more stock out onto the layout though it's all ones that have been seen previously. I don't expect there being anything new anytime soon although I do have two RevolutioN Cargowaggons that haven't yet been seen either on Skew Bridge or Worsley Dale. They arrived along with my IWA log wagons a few weeks/months ago now so I might give them a run in the coming days and see if they perform any better in the garden than the log carriers did. I attempted to do a bit of filming today but I find it gets in the way of actually enjoying running trains. I'm not sure it's worth it to be honest as you can't sit back and relax when you've got a controller in one hand, gopro camera in another and nowhere left to hold your phone. I never was any good at juggling. 24009 was never intended to be a 'Scottish' loco for Worsley Dale. It was one of many impulse purchases I made and I only recently discovered that it actually spent time in Scotland between 1971-75 so that's good enough for me to add it to the roster. Being a Sutton Loco Works model fitted with sound and stay-alive it performs brilliantly and sounds as good as any loco I've heard. Saying that...I'd had it running for probably 30-60 minutes before I just happened to notice something by the side of the track near Low Shott viaduct and it turned out to be a sandbox & pipe. I hadn't had any mishaps so it had obviously just fallen off. I consider myself extremely fortunate to have seen it. 37401 'Mary Queen of Scots' is one of my 'go to' loco's along with 37025. I tend to grab the weathered ones before the pristine ones although I haven't yet dared tackle the SLW 24's. 37401 is seen here at one of my favourite locations for photographs as it exits Stack Gill viaduct and runs along Stackgarth Gill. Another of my favourite photograph spots is by the side of Low Shott viaduct and 37401 is seen crossing the viaduct immediately before entering the shed and Shieling Bridge station hauling one of my favourite wagon rakes - the OTA log wagons. And although the weather today has been extremely pleasant, during the early part of the day it was almost impossible to get photos or videos that were not affected by sun shining directly in the camera lens or that didn't have the shadow of the camera itself (or worse..me) in the foreground. 45010 had direct sunlight to contend with as it hauls the West Highland excursion rake across Stack Gill viaduct.
    4 points
  6. Throughout 2021 I was working on the electronics side of our hobby. Although I have a background in electronics I was out of date, and the Arduino revolution had completely passed me by. I've been playing catch up. But this has mainly been on my indoor projects. My first project on Amblethorpe is a passenger information display for Colwick Station. It shows "live" train information, but it's of fake trains. I've not connected it up to sensors on the track so it is not triggered by the coming and goings. This is possible, but I don't run Amblethorpe to a timetable so there is no point trying to do it. There are 3 screens each 22mm by 11mm with 128*64 pixels to play with. The type is tiny, either 6px or 5px high. They cost £6.50 per screen. They are dynamic, with some trains randomly delayed or cancelled. The clock ticks off the seconds minutes and hours. The destination stops scroll across the screen when required. These 3 are driven by a single Arduino micro controller, which cost £3.50. it all runs on 5 volts, and this can be pulled off the DCC track bus using a two quid voltage regulator. So the whole thing cost £25. I used my plotter cutter to make a hosing out of black styrene. It's a bit bulky, but I hid most of it by placing a Welcome to Colwick sign on the top. This year I'll get round to motoring the points on the Paltyville Ridge & Peak Railroad using and Arduino to provide the control and frog juicing.
    4 points
  7. Spotted this on my bike ride today. Not sure what class it is, but definitely a 3-car EMU.
    4 points
  8. All boards covered with felt. I was not 100% had a bad night food wise. My neighbour is a god send. I just help by being a goffer. Eevern placed an oval of track on and ran a small tank engine. Needless to say It help with my feelings. Now I need dry warm weather to start the first loop.
    3 points
  9. Hello together! I wanted to give you a sign of life from me again. At the moment I'm finishing the wiring of the layout with the 10 boosters. I've also reached the last level indoors. With kind regards Thomas
    3 points
  10. I have been looking at others layouts for a while now and so I thought i'd share my recently constructed loop, its was constructed just after Easter and consists of a single loop with one siding running on dc. I'm happy to provide more details if anyone is interested. I have just added a couple of photos to show off what has been completed so far, ill add some more in the future with trains running. I'm also wandering whats the best way to attach videos? It looks like ill have to upload them to youtube unless there is another way.
    3 points
  11. Bone on an MGR. First time I've got to run this loco! Aside a faulty point switch, having to adjust one corner of track, and having to clean the contacts for one of the dublo light signals, winter had been kind
    3 points
  12. Back at the Ranch I like to get some winter running done, partly to show the doubters that it's nothing special. Outdoor operation is down to the weather, not the season. Today's chilly sunshine following a dry period was ideal. Mind you, I had to do quite a bit of gardening first to clear growth and debris off the track, but once the rails were rubbed clean and vacuumed the Class 66 with her newly acquired sound chip had a good day out, as did I. Now that the loco has a chip, photos can be taken with the headlights on which looks much better. Thanks, Josh. Memo to self: need to weight the containers to improve the poor riding - and to weather the wagons and containers... Not sure the pictures need any captions, except to say that the loco is shown hauling two different intermodal trains.
    3 points
  13. The sound of Class 66 music Josh, who is a regular visitor to the DGR, has very kindly fitted my Class 66 with top quality sound. Here's a video of it running on his layout - which is well worth a listen. Looking forward to letting her out on the DGR again...
    3 points
  14. While I've been messing around weathering the hoppers and mineral wagons, I've had the WD 2-8-0 No.90630 hauling them round the layout. I keep stopping the train to remove the next wagons in need of attention, replacing them with ones I've either just weathered or modified in some way. 90630 hasn't been used for some time and unfortunately although the sound still works it appears to have lost its ability to smoke. On odd occasions it emits a puff or two but generally there's very little sign of any or even nothing at all. Storage doesn't do any of these models any good. Here's a couple of photos taken this evening showing 90630 hauling the rake of recently weathered mineral wagons. I've attempted to remove the colour light signal from the background which seemed a bit inappropriate for the setting. Part of the rake of 28 loaded 16t mineral wagons I weathered years ago can be seen alongside in the sidings - the remainder are behind the camera, giving me room for the photo. And again a smokeless 90630 is seen hauling the rake of minerals and hoppers past the sidings. Monochrome suits these well I think.
    3 points
  15. You can wait a long time for a train to come along... so when it does, better have the camera ready. Here, after a lot of maintenance work on clearing the track, is the 4MT on a local train, first heading along Bamboo Curtain Straight: Catching the driver passing Throstlebeck Sidings: Rounding Sycamore Curve Three shots at different points on Foxdale Bank And finally heading into the sun across the Northern Viaduct
    3 points
  16. The first circuit is closed, wired and put into operation. Pictures from the opening train.
    3 points
  17. Apologies for the long read! I haven't posted anything here for a few weeks now and although I've managed to get some great photos during that time I would like to jump right up to the present day because I've just spent 3 days, or rather early evenings, trying to capture a specific bird. We went out for a walk last Wednesday morning along the Leeds & Liverpool canal near Gargrave and Pam spotted a Barn Owl a distance away on the other side of the canal. It was too far away for a decent photo but it's the first time I have actually been able to stand there and watch one flying around. I wasn't aware that they were even active at 9.30am! A (very friendly) farmer was tending his sheep in the field next to the towpath and he was curious as to what we were trying to photograph. He told us that the Barn Owls were nesting in an old Ash tree which he pointed out to us but it isn't in a location that is easily or safely accessible as it was alongside the main A65 where there is no footpath. Anyway, I was determined that I would try to get a photo. Two days later I went alone along the canal armed with my camera. I decided to go in the early evening so it was approximately 7pm as I set off along the towpath. There was no sign of any Barn Owls so I continued walking to a spot where I had previously seen Curlews and Brown Hare's in the hope of getting a picture of some sort before turning around and making my way back. Not far from where we had previously seen the Owls 2 days earlier there was a moored narrowboat and the gentleman onboard was looking through his binoculars. As I passed I asked if he had seen anything interesting as I was going to mention about the Owls and would you believe it, he was actually watching a Barn Owl which he pointed out to me. Yes, there it was, on the towpath side of the canal on the far side of the field where the farmer had been speaking to us earlier. I managed to focus on it but it was by now getting very dull with some dark clouds looming overhead. It dropped to the ground and came up with a mouse before immediately heading back towards the Ash tree. It then diverted slightly and began heading directly for me, looking me in the eyes before swerving its way around me. I couldn't have positioned myself better if I had tried. Wow! I just kept snapping away but the photos were very dark and although I couldn't have wished for better poses, the quality was somewhat disappointing. The following day I tried again but there was no sign of the Owl and, to cap it all off, after standing there for almost 2 hours the heavens opened and I got soaked to the skin before I could make it back to the car. Undeterred, the following evening I was back for another try with a slightly brighter sky and I was feeling optimistic. I paced up and down for 2 hours, snapping away at anyting that moved but although I had a great view of the Ash tree the Owl hadn't made an appearance. One last look before I called it a day (or night!) and wait a minute, there was just a small speckle of white. Looking closer it was a Barn Owl just about to emerge from a cavity in the tree, which it did a few seconds later. I was hoping it would come across the canal again but instead it stayed on the opposite side, across the road, and across the field. But then it turned and flew directly towards me just as it had done 2 days before. I was standing right in front of a small tree so was well camouflaged and I got a number of photos before it eventually set eyes on me and went on its merry way. I continued to watch it at a distance for some time afterwards as it hunted for prey. So the pictures...well as I said, the earlier ones were very dark due to the conditions but luckily modern photo editing software is capable of rescuing them to some extent so here is the Barn Owl on that first evening with its prey. The second night was in slightly better light And although I clipped one of its wings in this next photo, I decided to crop it slightly and focus attention on the face as it closed its eyes They are just 5 from well over 200 photos I took over those 2 nights and I must admit that it feels worth all the standing around and all that soaking I endured.
    2 points
  18. I have had a great time playing trains and watching them pass by. Sorting through my stock to find out what runs or not and so stared with one of my Wrenn Duchesses and a Bachmann Jubilee. Very pleased that the Wrenn loco performed well. I know they not the most detailed Locos around but they have good weight and seem to pull well. Next a Western Class 52. Very pleasing to see them have a good run. The Dean Goods ran well but poor pulling power. Now these two newer sets GWR HST and Class 67 with a rake of Pullman stock behind. So far all have managed curry loop by the shed well. Hopefully will try my older steam to see how they like playing outside.
    2 points
  19. Just packed away and hopefully finished with the soldering. Had time to run a few locos I had picked up on eBay and had not been able to run them. What as surprised me is that I have only connected one power feed and so far runs ok. I was expecting to have to take a second feed up to the small loop end. Tornado as some pulling power had nine Pullman coaches without a problem. While that was running my camera was flat, so picture of LMS and BR maroon stock. I always wanted a blue Pullman when I had my N gauge layout. They came into production just as I sold off all my N stock. The price today in 00 is beyond my small budget but was able to get old of a Triang one. In good condition as not got all the bells and whistles but runs well and am looking for a couple more coaches to fill it out. Love watching the come into Snow Hill Station, Birmingham on a Saturday with my Ian Allen ABC book of loco numbers. Fond memories. Then to close my evening running tried the Class 66 and was the only one to give me problems with the leading bogie and 5 LMS coaches was to much for it. Hopefully when its run in it might improve.
    2 points
  20. So, Pentney Parkway is to open to an audience this Sunday. Our local Parish Council are having a Garden Safari so it's the ideal excuse. A group of freinds will be helping me operate, some for the first time. Now just to repair the point that got damaged by a falling branch, clean the track, clear the leaves, ties a plant back.... oh god... it's never going to be ready in time!!!
    2 points
  21. I've made a representation of some aluminium ingot loads to add to 3 of my BBA wagons. Now I know they are far from perfect, probably totally incorrect, and on the wrong wagons with securing straps that appear to have nowhere to fasten to but I think they are an improvement on the empty wagons and I'm happy to accept all the errors. I began by making a batch of ingot shaped loads from some left over pieces of MDF but having completed the 12 I required I decided that they just didn't look right. Compared to some photos I've seen they were too thin and too wide so I decided to add another thinner piece of MDF and cut them down slightly so they were narrower and chunkier. After several coats of MDF sealant I gave them a quick spray with some aluminium coloured paint. I should probably have sanded them further to disguise the join between the two MDF sections and remove some of the paint accumulation along the edges but it's only a representation and not an actual replica load. I placed the ingots on lengths of timber as in the photos I was referring to even though the wagons are not the same types. Short lengths of electrical tape were used to make securing straps though whether this type of wagon had provision for that I really don't know but I wanted to mimic the layout on the photos as much as possible. My main reference photo shows 2 wagons with the rear most wagon having an additional ingot and so I have attempted to replicate that too. One particular detail I tried to include was the dimple on each end of the ingots which you may be able to make out on the one below. From a distance I think they look okay but obviously they wouldn't stand up to close scrutiny. I'll see if I can get a photo of them behind a loco or two shortly.
    2 points
  22. A little video update.
    2 points
  23. frustrating day soldering rails that have been outside for 11 years. I did the vast majority of it inside at my desk, but that didn't make it any easier. By late afternoon I was ready for track relaying. I persisted and got the track down the full length of the straight, soldering in the last bonds that I couldn't do inside. There's still more to do, but we are away for the weekend, so it will have to wait. Monday's running session may be a bit different.
    2 points
  24. Without it becoming quite a substantial structure I suppose the only suitable material for a waist level railway is timber when there is no raised bed or wall in the garden that you can build a railway around. Take care with building and treating the wood and you should get a fair number of years out of it but be prepared for maintenance (quite enjoyable) and perhaps eventual replacement (a pain!). Wood does twist and warp and it soon becomes evident when you view trains running. There is an external grade MDF board now available that is supposed to withstand water/moisture (can't remember the exact claims) that has been mentioned on the forum before which might be worth investigation though I have no idea of the price. Such things don't normally come cheap. Wherever possible, blocks are by far the most suitable material if time is taken to lay them carefully but I make no claims as to having been that careful with mine. Whichever material you decide on just make sure that you build it as flat and level as possible (along and across) otherwise you'll be returning to this thread with a greater undertsanding of why it was posted in the first place LOL!
    2 points
  25. My track has been down for a decade. There are places where the baseboards have turned to paper! Trains run over them fine even though the track is basically unsupported. More of a problem is where the baseboards have sunk. I cannot see with the naked eye that one section of board is lower than the next so the gradient is very small. But some of my trains really struggle on these unintended climbs.
    2 points
  26. Whilst many have been enjoying running trains in the heat we have been getting, I have lifted the track at the top and started work on the extension to the other flowerbed. First, the track at the top was lifted and the old board cut in half... ... Then the new board went in with a spur to go onto the new boards. The loop track is now second radius at this point and so probably not suitable for some stock but that should not be a problem as the main running lines will be third radius and above. Here you can also see the new point, which has been installed connecting what once was the siding and the loop line. The ply sections are to become a five lane storage yard with return loop for the other half of the railway. This means that both halves of the railway can run separately allowing two trains to run at once.
    2 points
  27. Sleeping Cars on the West Highland Line Here's the video:
    2 points
  28. Sleeping Cars for Fort William It being high summer(!), photos can more easily be taken of sleeping cars in daylight. So here are a few on the West Highland Line of a train taking passengers towards the Western Isles... The first photo shows the sleepers arriving from London in the suburbs of Glasgow, to be joined to a local portion for the onward journey. The two portions are combined into a 9 coach train... Quite a challenge for a Class 4 engine on what will be an arduous route Hear those exhaust echoes ringing off the rocks... But the crew enjoy the downgrades... And glance out at the dramatic scenery... While keeping careful eyes on the road ahead... So all is looking good for an on-time arrival:
    2 points
  29. Goods to Go It was a freightful day in Dorking, and although we saw some wonderful wagons, there were also a few troublesome trucks (mostly in fact showing up track defects). First, a 9F came through Throstlebeck with a mixed goods train: Passing Foxdale Carr Hall Across Foxdale Bank and rounding Sycamore Curve Meanwhile, back at Throstlebeck Sidings a Black 5 was assisting with shunting and after being turned, departed with a rake of coal wagons Running off the Northern Viaduct across Foxdale Bank and passing beneath Black Ghyll Not long after, the 9F returned with another mixed goods which was last seen heading away from Foxdale Bank...
    2 points
  30. The APT has had a run in the garden. I shoved a 2 minute video together very quickly, I didn't have the time to edit it properly with intro.
    2 points
  31. So far so good and I've now got a nice quantity of conifer 'logs' cut and ready for use. However, it's still not been plain sailing. I did this test load earlier this afternoon using some of the logs I'd cut earlier which I glued together in a central pile allowing me to place the conifer logs around them. It looks fine but the problem was when I put it on the scales it was just under 200g gross weight which means nearly 80g of added timber, an increase of almost 30g on my previous load test. Removing the 5 glued piles, I weighed them on their own and they were almost 50g so obviously they're too dense and ultimately too heavy. So this one below is my latest attempt which also looks absolutely fine.... ...the difference being that I've removed the glued central pile and replaced it with a piece of foam which weighs virtually nothing. I think this might work and it will save me the 50g that those glued central piles were adding so the conifer logs should add no more than 30g total load per wagon if my calculations are correct.
    2 points
  32. I have put brass bearing caps in my Hornby PGA wagons, as most of the holes were badly worn. I changed the axles too iirc, to metal ones. Its worth the effort to get wagons that run freely and the axles dont fallout, when you pick them up!
    2 points
  33. This is a video I uploaded a few days ago but never got round to making it public as I wasn't sure the pace would be to everyones liking. It does however show the type of movements that were frequently carried out when coal was an important and valuable commodity. Until the railways came to their senses drivers of coal trains from certain depots would take their loaded trains to a stabling yard or sidings further down the line, detach it, and pick up an empty set of wagons for their return journey. Another driver from another depot would then collect that loaded set, take it to a local power station for discharge before returning the empty wagons back to the sidings, or perhaps take it for loading at a local colliery. It created an almost non-stop stream of movements into and out of local sidings, detaching one set to attach another and so on. Simply crazy at the time! Later on it became more usual for a driver to work a train from its originating colliery or loading point directly through to the power station for discharge before returning home with the empty wagons cutting out many of those senseless and unnecessary movements. Anyway, in a much smaller scale but no less tedious....
    2 points
  34. The Long Way Home The Bachmann Class 66 has been away for a works visit to have superb sound installed (ESU LokSound chip, Jamie Goodman sound files and two speakers), the result of Josh being generous with his skills, time and advice. This evening we tested her out on Wellbridge, a layout belonging to the Crawley Model Railway Society, and the result was impressive. I'm hoping to get her out onto DGR metals again soon. Here's a nice photo of her attracting professional attention from the station staff (thanks to Ewan for the pic):
    2 points
  35. The grids and PTA's during sunnier months.
    2 points
  36. It's been a few weeks since I last set foot in the attic and so today I decided that I would go up there and take a few photos seeing as the weather isn't suitable for going out with the camera. I normally take photos using the camera on my phone as it's the most convenient way but today I chose to use the DSLR knowing full well that in the limited space round the tracks it's quite some task to do so without damaging anything - and I am prone to damaging things! The layout doesn't really lend itself to that many photo opportunities with the main area being around the sidings and shunters cabin. It's the best area to plonk a large camera and any other spot means having to move stock around in the sidings in order to make sufficient room. It's also pretty dull up there even with all the lighting and I find the DSLR always struggles in low light but never mind. 56003 in Loadhaul livery with a loaded MGR. 56095 Harworth Colliery with loaded Cawoods conatiners ...and again as it heads on its way. 60022 in EWS livery with loaded HTA hoppers 58048 'Coventry Colliery' in Coal Sector livery with loaded MGRs. I must see about adding driver figures to some of these cabs. 60078 in Mainline blue livery in charge of the PFA Gypsum empties 56049 on empty TEA tanks... ...and onwards 31233 hauling loaded HEA wagons And finally 31233 with HEAs is about to pass 56049 on the TEA tanks I had hoped the photos would turn out a bit better than they have done so it looks like I'm going to have to find which settings works best if I use this camera again.
    2 points
  37. The end is in sight for this current batch of wagons. I've given all the chassis' a coat of dirt using the airbrush so I can finally start putting some of them back together again. The final 2 wagons to be weathered were a couple of 16t minerals, one of them quite rusty... ...and one not quite so rusty. I do like seeing the side doors rusted over as in the first two photos above and the bit of sponge over tacky enamel paint does a decent job of replicating that rusted appearance.
    2 points
  38. Leaving the viaducts alone for the time being, I decided instead to clean the tracks round Worsley Dale (tick), trim back some encroaching vegetation (tick), vacuum along the viaduct tops (tick), clear away the cobwebs from inside the tunnels (tick), check all the points were still operating correctly (tick) and run a short train (tock...!!) Yes, there was nothing, the handset wouldn't connect to the router. But hold on a moment, it might help if I plug the router in (tick). That's right, it's been a long time since I did anything on Worsley Dale. However, that wasn't quite the end of my problems as even with the router plugged in the handset still wouldn't connect to the router. I tried connecting using the app on my phone and luckily that worked so I removed the batteries from the handset, replaced them and it finally connected. 37425 'CHARLIE BOWER' was chosen to haul the first train, a short 3 coach set and it completed the circuit without a single hitch and that was without running the CMX track cleaner and IPA solution round. In fact the CMX is up in the attic and I never bothered bringing it down. I had a good hour or two running the train round and filming short clips but it was very dull and the light wasn't the best. I haven't done anything along Buttlebank, the stretch along the bottom of the garden, for a long time now. This is where I began adding a rock face to form a cutting. It really should be near the top of my to do (to complete) list as it creates a nice backdrop for the trains. You'll motice the unfinished sections in the distance. Here's another couple of photos of 37425 approaching Watch House Tunnel
    2 points
  39. Hi Thomas, I've cheated I'm afraid, the stone viaduct is the only bridge on the railway that I didn't build myself. I found a guy who was selling them on eBay in 2016. It's a 00 scale model of the Moorswater Viaduct in Liskeard, Cornwall. The original model was made from individual crushed stones glued together and a rubber mould taken and then casting made in R.C. concrete. He was selling them as containers for alpine plants. I filled-in the groove down the centre with concrete where the pants once were to form a flat crackbed.
    2 points
  40. Hi, Yes, extremely sad news. It came as a huge shock. We had built up a really good friendship and we were in touch with him virtually on a daily basis up until he was admitted to hospital. Her really was a truly wonderful human being. We even swapped some of our rolling stock, one of which was his beautiful Flying Scotsman and 12 coaches. I will cherish these for ever. It's also so sad that he never got to finish all his big projects that he was working on. My condolences to Desley and his family. RIP Tony.
    2 points
  41. Work inside is coming along and we now have a cowboy watching to make sure the bridge is ok 😁 The tunnel and hill are one piece and can be lifted off if access is needed to the point. Signal placement isn't ideal but I'm having to use a bit of "artistic license". If I put it further away from the tunnel the clearence is very tight. It does the job though. An in built sensor turns the signal red when a train passes then starts the timer to go through the light sequence. If the point is thrown the signal will stay red until it is put back in favour of the mainline. Being a traintech sensor signal I can buy another 2 sensors and place them along the outside section and link with a wire to replicate block signalling in the future.
    2 points
  42. The last of the bridges over this gorge is completed.
    2 points
  43. Hi All, here's my Network Southeast EMU on the garden railway
    2 points
  44. Well, in the last few weeks I've been puffing up so much that I've lost 8kg. But now I've come a long way on that.
    2 points
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