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      PLEASE UPDATE YOUR BOOKMARKS   03/21/2017

      I have now removed all files associated with our old forum and the new forum has now been relocated in the root of the OO Garden Railway website. In order to continue visiting the forum you should amend your bookmarks to www.oogardenrailway.co.uk as before.

cleanerg6e

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cleanerg6e last won the day on April 13

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About cleanerg6e

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  1. NFSA stands for National Film and Sound Archive in Australia. Here are two films shot in B&W. What struck me about them is that the sound is real not dubbed as often happens in archive films on railways. Darling Harbour is right in the heart of Sydney. It's narrated with music and interviews with crews who worked the area. Preserved Garratt 6029 is not truly representative of how Garrats looked in the days of steam. The thumbnail is how they looked.
  2. There is a model village called "Beckonscot" and it's located in Beaconsfield Buckinghamshire UK Griff and has a Gauge 1 railway with most of the locos built by Bassett-Lowke UK in the 1930's. On the three videos it's high likely that the models featured are from Bassett-Lowke. All the Bassett-Lowke locos at "Beckonscot" have got new motors in them as the old ones wear out. They do around 350 scale miles every year between April and October and yes they even run in the rain. All trains are in fixed formations and a permanently wired so all wheels on the train pick up current from the rails. Here's a cab ride video of Beckonscot Griff
  3. This is a Gauge 1 British Garden railway with a difference. These three videos tell of story. The youngest loco on this railway is the 7F and it's 30+ years old. The other locos are much older and they and the stock they haul are all tin plate. The current collection is all stud contact or for those who don't know that's the nail like pins between the rails. I know this a a OO Garden Railway Forum but this is extra special and must have taken many hours to make. This video is Cyril and Daisy in Duck or Grouse. This video is titled Not Quite Cricket where England plays Australia. This video is Cyril and Daisy go to the Seaside.
  4. Before handing over hard earned dollars/pounds or whatever currency you use on YouTube, google a persons channel to find out how much their net worth is. For YouTubers who've set up Patreon accounts they can rake in a huge amounts of cash and will often ask for more. There is a YouTuber who is the richest YouTuber ever who put a video up in September 2016 saying he was broke. His net worth as of December 2016 was $61,000,000USD. He then set up a Patreon account and got another $4,000 from unsuspecting people. I personally don't give money to YouTubers. People say that they put a lot of time an effort into making their videos. Well I put a lot of time and effort into my employment but I don't ask complete strangers for more money because I think I deserve it. I can't anyway. It's illegal for government employees to make extra money of that sort. There is another person who has 1.7 million subs and has a "how to fix your car" channel and he asks for regular donations. I googled him and he earns $650USD per day or $240,000 per year. So he hardly needs more money from me or anyone else. He gets paid from product endorsements etc yet he asks for more money from viewers. It always pays to do a bit of research on people especially when it comes to money.
  5. I like your new back scenes Ian. Have you sprayed them with a matt varnish to protect them from dirt. Is the pink patch a representation of willow herb? If you do decide to trial concrete with ballast make sure the concrete is rapid set. But instead of using a trigger action spray bottle try a pump action bottle say two litres and set the nozzle to a wide fine mist.
  6. Soldering bonding wires on rail joints or feed wires to a bus wire really is about as much fun as watching paint dry. But it is worth it. Please try to remember that a garden railway operates in the real world and not the climate controlled world of our indoor counterparts. Also remember to solder the wires to the OUTSIDE of the rails only and not the inside where the wheel flange rubs. Don't use a "blob" of solder on the rail joint as outside the rails needs to not only expand in the heat from the sun but also to contract once the heat of the sun has gone. Don't be afraid of using too much "flux" and don't hoard it like a single malt whiskey. Splash it on with all the finesse of a boxer landing a left hook. Better to have too much than not enough, just like the single malt whiskey. The trouble with not soldering is that dirt will get into the rail joint and dirt doesn't conduct electricity. So your train/s if running slowly will just stall on the rail joint and after awhile will become a real pain. This stalling will usually happen when friends come round to admire your handy work and you won't get a "pat on the back" when you have to resort to "the big helping hand from the sky". If your friends become totally engrossed in running trains on a railway that you have designed and built and with liquid refreshment in the shape of wine or for us a cold beer or the Brits a warm beer then even if your friends don't heap praise upon you, you will know that they are loving your railway due to your diligence with maintenance. With garden railways in the small scales using mains supplied electricity one needs to keep up the maintenance. Because of the widely varying temperature range in the real world soldered bonds can and do drop off. It's caused by ambient temperature variations affecting the molecules in the solder. Some say that you have to clean off the old grey solder off the sides of the rails. I never did. I just applied some liquid flux and using a soldering iron reheated the old solder and reattached the bond. I found that it happened after winter but it didn't happen to all of the bonded rail joints (thank heavens) and I just needed to clean the entire rails and run a train to check where it stuttered and using a pair of fine nosed pliers I'd gently pull at the track bonds and a bond would easily come away from it's soldered place on the rail side. So I re-soldered it.
  7. The reason I want to have a large two room building is to have the layout in one half and a modelling area in the other. There is also another reason. When I get too old for this garden railway game or I have to move out the second building can be turned into accommodation for either a trial basis/permanent moving in of the mother in-law or for a teenager who wants a bit of freedom from mum and dad but can't afford the very high rents of the area. My house is only a two bedroom dwelling and suits me to a tee, but to have another large room where an addition to the family or change living arrangements could be advantageous from a selling point of view. But it won't be cheap to build. It will however be just two rooms and if others after me want to add a shower, toilet and kitchen facilities that's up to them. The furthest I'd go would be a small camping fridge and an electric jug for making coffees. Due to our high summer temperatures it will have to be air conditioned. A inverter split system will do the job. The roof will be colourbond pre painted corrugated steel with solar panels and "spin away" ventilators the same that I have on the house. A little known fact with solar panels is that in the very high summer temperatures that they produce less, yes less electricity. They're only really good to about 30 degrees centigrade. Wind turbines also have a drawback. In high winds the turbine disengages from the rotating blades otherwise the mechanism would wear out too quickly. As for the length of the garden railway, our fatherly figure in the shape of Mick (that should get me thrown off) has advised me to have a smaller length of run. I'm inclined to agree with him. Everybody wants to see a running garden railway but those same people want nothing to do with the maintenance side of a garden railway. As we get more sunshine than rain no doubt the garden railway will be built first with the indoor railway being done on very hot or rainy days.
  8. 3026 and 3102 head a tour train from Bombala in mid winter 1985. This line is now closed and many sections have been lifted. This is the only footage that I've been able to find on YouTube of trains on the line. The two half round wagons behind 3102 are "water gins" the leading one is a bogie variety and the second one is a four wheeler. They are necessary for all water columns for steam engines had disappeared on this line.
  9. Super heated 3001 with slide bar covers and saturated 3026 run from Cowra to Blayney on the Blayney to Demondrille branchline in 1994. This line is now closed throughout due to needing massive investment to upgrade the track work. 3026 suffered a major problem on this trip which is shown in the film.
  10. This short journey is on the now preserved part of the Dorrigo Branch line. It starts from near Glenraegh and goes up to the two tunnels going through one of the tunnels and looking into the other which is full of bats. There is then a condensed trip back down the line towards Glenraegh. The footage is a little shaky and the growth of line side vegetation is very vigorous with a high rainfall in this part of the north coast of NSW.
  11. Filmed in 1993 two locos run a six coach train to Michelago from Queanbeyan. The line has since closed but when open ran all the way to Bombala in southern NSW. The two locos have a history. 1210 was built in 1878 and at one time was the oldest operating loco in the world. It was withdrawn several time but due to economic conditions it reentered service finally being withdrawn for the last time in 1958 at 80 years of age. It was plinthed outside Canberra railway station and the ARHS society negotiated with the authorities to keep it clean. Further negotiations saw the loco removed from the plinth and placed within the confines of the ARHS at their Canberra base. It was restored to operational condition in 1988. 1210 is 8 years older than Caledonian Single 4-2-2 No. 123 which was built in 1886 but the Scottish authorities think that she's too old to ever run again under her own steam, or they're just being very tight fisted which is a well known characteristic of the Scots. 3016 started life in 1903 as a 4-6-4 tank engine hauling trains around the suburban network in Sydney. When those lines were electrified in the 1920's. The loco was rebuilt as a tender engine in 1930 and she received super heating in 1941along with an extended smoke box. In 1965 she had more miles than any of her 145 sisters nearly 2,000,000 miles. She's been a very active loco in preservation so she would have over two million miles now.
  12. Well actually Tony the old Glenbrook Tunnel was on the mainline. Originally to climb from Emu Plains up the eastern face of the mountains there was a zig zag. That was replaced by a single track viaduct and the old single track Glenbrook Tunnel. Due to it's horrible reputation and at least one accident when the crew of a loco was overcome by smoke from their engine. The push up loco at the rear had already reversed out of the tunnel and was getting ready to reenter the tunnel when the wagons and loco came out of the tunnel and hit the push up loco. The train loco crew were unconscious on the floor of their cab. What a way to run a railway. Then a double track viaduct and a double track tunnel replaced the old single track tunnel which then had the two uses shown in my previous post. On the western side of the mountains is the now famous Lithgow Zig Zag which was in operation until 1910. It was replaced by 10 tunnels with tunnels 1 and 10 being the longest. The Zig Zag tourist railway is creeping slowly towards reopening but only when the safety regulator gives the go ahead. The trouble with many railway enthusiasts in NSW is that they tend to look upon authority as people who like to meddle in their affairs and thus they are to be ignored and if that doesn't work you tell them "up yours" complete with hand signal. But the authorities come down on such people like a load of bricks and make them obey regulations. In the UK every preserved railway knows that there are regulations that must be adhered to or else they would suffer the same fate. They seem to have no problems obeying regulations, but our lot seem to fall back on their convict ancestry.
  13. This railway tunnel was taken out of use years ago and has had a two uses that aren't railway related. The above video is one use the old tunnel was put to. Here's another video in the same tunnel showing it's second use after that use had ceased. The company that ran it an Australian owned company was bought by an Asian company and their H&S left a lot to be desired. The company is in battle with the state government for they just walked away and left a filthy putrid mess and they're in no hurry to clean it up. The tunnel today is closed off to the public and no doubt still in a putrid mess. I think it should be totally cleaned out and reopened to the public as part of a walking track. It should never again be used for any business purposes. I can remember walking through it myself when it was the Australian owned and operated mushroom growing farm and it was clean inside, but wet. Outside it was a summer temperature of 40+ degrees but in the tunnel it was a cool sub 20 degrees. Well cool to us. Even then water leaked freely into the tunnel and that was years ago. Judging by the above footage it still does. The thumbnail above shows 3673 a 4-6-0 of 1928 crossing the present double line Knapsack Viaduct. 3673 was the only 36 class to be fitted with large smoke deflectors but they didn't work very well and were removed. The other 36 fitted with smoke deflectors was 3612 and they were of the small variety and very similar to the smoke deflectors fitted the SR King Arthur class. They didn't work well either and they too were removed. The main problem was that the Westinghouse Air Pump interrupted the air flow so whilst the exhaust was lifted on the driver side (left side of loco) the exhaust tended to beat down on the fireman's side (right side of loco). We are looking at the drivers side. The 36 class never went through the old Glenbrook tunnel and a double track deviation (the present line) had bypassed the old tunnel by the time this photo was taken. In the video there is a photo of a large 4-8-2 emerging from a tunnel. That tunnel is the present double track Glenbrook Tunnel.
  14. Hi Roddy, yes I did google "Summit tunnel fire" and read what happened. Some of the bricks melted in the intense heat but there was no structural damage to the tunnel. Here Garretts weren't favoured in single line tunnels due to loading gauge restrictions. As can be seen the loco is of large dimensions and they often fitted single line tunnels like the proverbial "cork in a bottle" or like the tube trains in London. But being steam locos in long single line tunnels crews would notice the air temperature rising. None of our tunnels had ventilation shafts and there's one near to me called the old Glenbrook Tunnel which was notorious for bad ventilation. It leaked so the interior was always damp and it was on a curve the enemy of proper ventilation. If a loco slipped in the tunnel the crews were sometimes overcome by smoke and fumes and were on the cab floor unconscious. Most trains heading up the mountains were banked and if the crew of the banking loco reversed out of the tunnel to save themselves being overcome by smoke and fumes they had to be careful and keep a sharp watch ahead for the train rolling out of the tunnel with no one in control of it. The guard would have screwed the handbrake on in his brake van but the loco crew would either be near to blacking out or they would have blacked out. I think the grade through the tunnel was 1 in 40.
  15. The Mountain High Railway was begun around the late 1980's and was on the line from Tumut to Batlow. It folded around 1991 through lack of interest being too far away from Sydney. Here are three videos of the railway filmed in 1989 using a small shunting 0-6-0 diesel of unknown origin with an ex NSW railways passenger coach and a bogie flat converted into an open air coach. This is all raw unedited footage. In video number 2 is a view of the wide Gilmore Valley In this the third and final video of the line we have two ex NSW railway coaches and D10 and English Electric Diesel. She was a shunter at the Port Kembla Steel Works. Looking up on info for D10 it's stated she has since been scrapped. Being a EE she has a sort of class 37 sound to her. Since this video was taken Batlow Station has been demolished in an unbelievable idea of "preserving" the station precinct. Humm. Batlow station is where you see a lot of small wooden boxes which apples were packed into as Batlow is a huge apple growing area. It gets very cold here in the wintertime as Tumut is close to the Ski slopes. Tumut is also the area for the Snowy Mountains Hydroelectric Scheme which was built in the 1950's by European Immigrants mainly Italians and Hungarians.